[Toby Harriman] Gotham City SF // A Timelapse Film

ORIGINAL: https://vimeo.com/119318850


[NYTIMES] The Secret Life of Passwords

ORIGINAL ARTICLE: http://nyti.ms/1xrDxxa

For some people, these rituals are motivational. Fiona Moriarty, a competitive runner, told me that she often used “16:59” — her target time for the 5,000 meters in track. Mauricio Estrella, a designer who emailed me from Shanghai, described how his passwords function like homemade versions of popular apps like Narrato or 1 Second Everyday, which automatically provide its user with a daily reminder to pause and reflect momentarily on personal ambitions or values. To help quell his anger at his ex-wife soon after their divorce, Estrella had reset his password to “Forgive@h3r.” “It worked,” he said. Because his office computer demanded that he change his password every 30 days, he moved on to other goals: “Quit@smoking4ever” (successful); “Save4trip@thailand” (successful); “Eat2@day” (“it never worked, I’m still fat,” Estrella wrote); “Facetime2mom@sunday” (“it worked,” he said, “I’ve started talking with my mom every week now”).

 


[Jonathan Mann] ♫ iOS Autocomplete Song


The Pixar Theory

Originally posted on Jon Negroni:

Every Pixar movie is connected. I explain how, and possibly why.

Several months ago, I watched a fun-filled video on Cracked.com that introduced the idea (at least to me) that all of the Pixar movies actually exist within the same universe. Since then, I’ve obsessed over this concept, working to complete what I call “The Pixar Theory,” a working narrative that ties all of the Pixar movies into one cohesive timeline with a main theme.

This theory covers every Pixar production since Toy Story. That includes:

  • A Bug’s Life
  • Toy Story 2
  • Monsters Inc.
  • Finding Nemo
  • The Incredibles
  • Cars
  • Ratatouille
  • Wall-E
  • Up
  • Toy Story 3
  • Cars 2
  • Brave
  • Monsters University

The point of this theory is to have fun and exercise your imagination while simultaneously finding interesting connections between these fantastic movies. If you hate fun and/or imagination, you probably won’t like this theory.

[SIDE NOTE: All text in…

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[TED] Why privacy matters

http://www.ted.com/talks/glenn_greenwald_why_privacy_matters


[Apple] Better


[O’Reilly] Full-stack developers

http://radar.oreilly.com/2014/04/full-stack-developers.html

Full-stack development is about exposing yourself to a broad range of ideas. This is a theme we’ll see repeatedly in the coming years. Being a full-stack developer isn’t about jumping immediately from working on the Hadoop cluster to the Java middleware to the JavaScript that runs in the browser. Specialization exists for a reason. But developers who understand the whole stack are going to build better applications. A back-end developer will understand what the front-end developers are doing, and be able to work with them so the application doesn’t generate requests that drive the database nuts. A front-end developer who understands design will be able to help the designers build applications that are both beautiful, and can run efficiently on any platform.

 


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