[Hollywood Ending] LIFE AFTER PI (Official)

Harsh reality. If we can’t start being paid for how we worked, we’ll only be able to work for how it’ll be paid. How much creativity can we get from this? Having almost identical problem in software development, I cried watching this video.

“Life After Pi” is a short documentary about Rhythm & Hues Studios, the L.A. based Visual Effects company that won an Academy Award for its groundbreaking work on “Life of Pi”– just two weeks after declaring bankruptcy. The film explores rapidly changing forces impacting the global VFX community, and the Film Industry as a whole.

This is only the first chapter of an upcoming feature-length documentary “Hollywood Ending,” that delves into the larger, complex challenges facing the US Film Industry and the many professionals working within it, whose fates and livelihood are intertwined.

http://www.hollywoodendingmovie.com/

Don’t punish Yourself

It’s given as a PUNISHMENT to a student to write sentences REPEATEDLY on a blackboard.

If you are not careful, it’s quite easy to REPEATEDLY paste copies of identical code snippets. Not using iterative methodologies and not trying to find algorithmic solutions, is like let yourself to be in the state of uncomfortable incompetency, which is a PUNISHMENT.

Migrated to WordPress.com

My blog had been residing in a hosted server for a few years. Along with blogging, for the purpose of teaching myself how to develop in the generic PHP & MySQL environment, I had been using this service paying annual hosting fee.

However, due to the decrease of my interest in PHP development, and need to get deeper into Django or Rails, I decided to move my blog to the free WordPress.com hosting. And I may use the service fee I just saved for other types of hosting in the future.

Having a separate hosted service and being able to tinker with WordPress(PHP) and MySQL did teach me a lot about how to set up a website and manage it. But I think it’s time to move on and challenge myself to get into newer and more serious type of development for web applications.

Since my future plan has less to do with blogging, I think it will be sufficient enough for me to use free blogging services like WordPress.com. Who knows, maybe I get to like this service more than I imagined and subscribe to paid plan.

Do your best to spend time for the Real Work

Recently, I had to work so much time on one element of the product, requested by the colleague who was not completely sure if the application was perfect enough for her to think that the product was alright to be released.

At the end, we have found that perfecting the element was impossible since it relies on the external conditions like network status. I had known about this, but I had to show it to her to convince her that it was impossible. She usually don’t understand about software limitations without actually seeing them.

I don’t disrespect perfectionism. Sometimes, even I can see myself spending so much time for just a few things of whole product, to satisfy my purposes for them.

However, it’s false to consider getting the perfect result is directly related to and only possible by working a lot of time on it.

And if such hours were spent for the sake of reenacting already known and proven limitations, you should accept the fact that you just wasted precious time which could be spent for the real work.

I am trying my best to use my work hours for the real work. But it’s irritating when it’s not possible because of incompetencies of others.

Steve Jobs, the artist of User Experience

On October 6th, 2011, the news of Steve Jobs’ death started spreading.

As a professional iOS developer, I was busy updating the applications to be prepared for upcoming iOS 5.

When I heard the news, like many people, sadness immediately fell on me.

It was just like what a fan could feel when our hero died.

He was like Michael Jackson to the pop music fans, Gregory Peck to the film lovers, and Bruce Lee to the martial artists.

Unlike them, however, Steve had used  the electronic devices and their software, which could provide the great user experience.

Probably, he could be the first one who had chosen this form of art, I think.

And Steve’s art was so entertaining and so right. None of us had to be ashamed of enjoying it.

Like BMW drivers, Harley Davidson riders, and Stephen King readers, us Apple users are so proud of our objects.

Thank you, Steve Jobs, for all your awesome artifacts joyfully shared to us. We will miss you a lot.